Time stands still at Hyde Park Barracks

 

Time is standing still for a while at Hyde Park Barracks, as we’ve allowed the turret clock to wind down for a much needed rest.

Convict clockmaker James Oatley, who built the clock in 1819, and Benjamin Lewis Vulliamy who rebuilt the mechanism in 1837, probably wouldn’t have been surprised to hear that after 200 years of ticking away, the clock needs a complete overhaul.

This highly specialised and painstaking work will take several months to complete, but we will aim to have Australia’s oldest public clock keeping time again as soon as possible in 2019.

Stay tuned for more details on the conservation work and its progress.

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About the Author

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Dr Fiona Starr
Curator
The Mint and Hyde Park Barracks Museum
Fiona claims her love of Australian history, genealogy and world history is hereditary – passed on by her mother and grandmother.

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