One of the first visitors to our new interactive family exhibition at the Museum of Sydney had a more personal connection than most.

On the Move explores the evolution of transportation through a distinctively Australian lens. Visitors are introduced to local transport trailblazers, including the inspiring Lennie Gwyther, who at nine years old rode his pony alone from country Victoria to attend the opening of the Sydney Harbour Bridge in 1932. On the exhibition’s opening weekend we were thrilled to welcome Lennie’s younger sister, Beryl Ferrier, to the museum. Beryl generously shared some family stories with staff, recalling the hubbub in the household during the preparations for Lennie’s departure. On his return, Lennie said his trip was ‘no big deal’ and described Sydney as a ‘bonza town’.

Curated by SLM’s Mel Flyte and brought to life with vibrant illustrations by James Gulliver Hancock, On the Move is full of hands‑on activities. Children can create their own future vehicles from LEGO®, construct and fly a paper plane, tinker in the mechanic’s shop, and truckloads more!

On the Move is supported by partner AMP Capital and supporting partner Grosvenor Place.

Door knocker on the front door of Meroogal

Foundation

Annual Appeal 2020Monday 4 May 2020

man with large camera photographing stone turret.
View of house across lawn.

Vaucluse House

Conservation in action: Vaucluse House turretsThursday 23 July 2020

Woolshed, Rouse Hill House and Farm

New online

The Woolshed: a rude timber buildingTuesday 23 June 2020

The Woolshed at Rouse Hill Estate, constructed c. 1858, is an example of the type of ‘rude’ timber farm buildings that can be found throughout rural Australia. These building are usually uncomplicated structures, built using materials readily available and often have a naïve, simple character.