Open today

10am–4pm
  • Wheelchair Accessible

Entry

Adult  | $15 
Concession  | $12 
Family*  | $38 
Members  | Free of charge
Children under 5 years  | Free of charge

*2 adults & 2 children or 1 adult & 3 children

Address

70 Alice Street, Rosehill, NSW 2142

Phone

+61 2 9635 9488

In line with recent NSW Government announcements, all Sydney Living Museums properties will close to the public from Saturday 26 June until Friday 2 July (inclusive) to help protect the health of all visitors and staff and minimise the spread of COVID-19. For more information visit our COVID update page.

 

Detail of a painting of Elizabeth Farm from a distance. Romanticised painting of Elizabeth Farm by Joseph Lycett. This was based on sketches and his memories and painted on his return to England.

This restful homestead hides a dark and stormy past. Built for the young military couple John and Elizabeth Macarthur and their growing family, Elizabeth Farm has witnessed major events in the growth of the colony, from the toppling of governors and convict rebellion to the birth of the Australian wool industry. As the original cottage was transformed into a fine colonial bungalow, the family’s life was equally gripped with turmoil and drama. Today, set within a re-created 1830s garden, Elizabeth Farm is an ‘access all areas’ museum. There are no barriers, locked doors or delicate furnishings. Australia’s oldest homestead is now our most immersive ‘living’ house museum.

Find out More About Elizabeth Farm

 


 

Budjari Naami Darug Nurawa. Good to see you on Darug Country. 
 
Our museums and places are on Aboriginal land. As we walk together and tread gently on this country we acknowledge the Burramuttagal of Darug nation, the traditional custodians, and pay respect to the Elders, past and present, and to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Aboriginal people continue to have a deep and continuing cultural attachment to this country and are the rightful interpreters of their history and heritage.
 
We acknowledge the impact Elizabeth Farm has had on Aboriginal Country and that this impact continues to be felt today. Was, is, and always will be Aboriginal land.

By the early 1800s Sydney was a bustling trading port. Keen to stake a claim in the developing trade with China, in 1808 John Macarthur sent his nephew Hannibal to Canton with a cargo of sandalwood, hoping to bankroll the import of valuable Chinese goods to Sydney.