Submitted by jays on 22 January 2014 - 3:49pm

This is an example of a drawn bonnet, a bonnet where fine fabric is ruched - or drawn - over a series of supports, usually cane or whalebone hoops. In this case the supports are strips of card and the fabric is bronze silk. The bonnet is also framed with silk-covered wire to hold its shape and piped with silk cording. This is the bonnet in an undressed state, ready to be trimmed for a new season: the brim extended perhaps with silk net or lace; a matching bavolet - a ruffle - applied to the back of the bonnet to cover the neck; and wide silk ribbons added at the sides to fasten the finished confection under the chin. The bonnet is provenanced to the family of James Edgar Heritage (1880-1957) C.M.G., of Launceston, Tasmania. Heritage was a well-known figure in Tasmanian legal circles and his mother’s family, the Hadfields, was also long-established in Launceston. His maternal grandmother, Catherine Coglin, was a milliner and may have made and worn this bonnet for her marriage to James Smith Hadfield in May 1850.

Photograph: Jamie North, 2013
Drawn bonnet in an undressed state, possibly made by Catherine Coglin around 1850 This is an example of a drawn bonnet and hat box. This is an example of a drawn bonnet, a bonnet where fine fabric is ruched - or drawn - over a series of supports, usually cane or whalebone hoops Drawn bonnet in an undressed state, possibly made by Catherine Coglin around 1850 Drawn bonnet in an undressed state, possibly made by Catherine Coglin around 1850
Portrait
Vaucluse House
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V2008/8