Sydney Living Museums is closing from Tuesday 24 March until further notice.

We are taking these steps as a public health precaution in support of measures to contain COVID-19.

Entry

Adult  | $15 
Concession  | $12 
Family*  | $38 
Members  | Free of charge
Children under 5 years  | Free of charge

*2 adults & 2 children or 1 adult & 3 children

Address

Corner West and Worrigee streets, Nowra, NSW 2541

Phone

+612 4421 8150
In line with decisions made by the National Cabinet as communicated by the NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian, Sydney Living Museums will today close to the public until further notice to help protect the health of all visitors and staff and minimise the spread of COVID-19 (coronavirus) in the State.
Family group portrait. Thorburn family at Meroogal, 13 January 1891.

A few blocks from the town centre of Nowra on NSW’s south coast, Meroogal is a rare and precious gem. Barely changed since it was built in the 1880s, the distinctive ‘Carpenter Gothic’ house has been loved and maintained by four generations of Thorburn and Macgregor women through the pleasures and labours of daily life. The house still overflows with their belongings – favourite books and ornaments, furniture, photographs, diaries and journals, newspaper clippings, receipts and recipes, appliances and clothes – and the garden, although reduced from its original size, still provides fruits and fresh produce that hint at their self-sufficiency and hospitality. Meroogal invites us into their lives, and through their private histories draws us into a shared and living past.

Find out More About Meroogal

 


The family were avid entertainers, hosting ‘at home’ tea parties each month for family and friends, and took great pride in their homegrown produce and homemade treats. Click here to see some of the much-loved heirloom recipes from Meroogal.

The latest at Meroogal

Handwritten letter with handwritten envelope on top.

Meroogal

Armistice Day: ‘the bells are ringing’Friday 9 November 2018

In early November 1918, Australians knew that the end of World War I was imminent and that an armistice was about to be signed between Germany and the Allies. After some false reports and premature peace rejoicings, the armistice was finally signed in France at 5am on Monday 11 November and came into effect at 11am Paris time. Reverend Tom Thorburn, Presbyterian minister, described how events unfolded in a letter written a few days later to his sister Tot Thorburn at Meroogal in Nowra.

Framed piece of embroidery with geometric and other motifs.

Meroogal

Meroogal Women’s Art Prize entries closeFriday 3 August 2018