By Location

  • As they explore the home of the Macarthur family, which dates from 1793, students learn about the lives of the family and their convict servants and the impact of colonisation on the traditional owners of the Parramatta area.

  • Established by wool pioneers John and Elizabeth Macarthur in 1793, Elizabeth Farm is one of Australia’s oldest surviving homesteads. Here, students will have the unique opportunity to investigate the rich food culture of colonial Australia by focusing on the Macarthurs’ experience.

  • As students are guided through the property, they discover that the household lived without the benefits of running water, bathrooms, electricity, appliances or paved roads.

  • What was life like for convict servants at the estate of John and Elizabeth Macarthur in 1828?

  • Students conduct an historical investigation into the process and impact of the British colonisation of Australia, examining sources and perspectives.

  • During this thought-provoking and engaging program, students learn that the Museum of Sydney is built over the site of first Government House, from where Arthur Phillip governed the young colony of NSW.

  • Students investigate the role of artists during the early colonial period and consider how they contributed to the development of the colony.

  • This Stage 1 History program gives students the opportunity to explore the working areas of the former farm, and investigate what life would have been like for children living there 120 years ago.

  • Students explore the former farm and examine a range of sources to learn about the expansion of NSW in the 19th century and investigate its impacts on the environment, the people of the Boorooberongal clan and the colonisers.

  • Integrating outcomes from History, PDHPE and Creative Arts, this program gives students the opportunity to learn first hand about what school life was like in the late 19th century.

  • While visiting the conserved interiors of Susannah Place Museum, students learn about historical archaeology and how combining research into artefacts with archival sources can develop a richer understanding of the past.

  • As they explore Susannah Place Museum, a row of terraces in Sydney’s Rocks area, students find out how residents shopped, lived and played in the 19th and early 20th centuries, and make comparisons with their lives today.

  • Students learn about what it was like to live at Vaucluse House for the wealthy family of William Charles and Sarah Wentworth, with their ten children and many servants. The students explore the ways of life for different household members at Vaucluse House, and make comparisons with their own lives today.

  • Students investigate how food is grown, discuss healthy food choices and play 19th-century games within the inspiring surroundings of a historic working estate and its lush gardens.

  • Vaucluse House is one of Sydney’s few 19th-century mansions still surrounded by its original gardens and bushland. Using the historic estate, students will investigate food choices and practises in colonial and pre-colonial times and learn and apply the principles of food preservation.