The infamous bushranger Andrew George Scott alias Captain Moonlite made a couple of appearances before the Water Police Court - now the Justice & Police Museum.

The first time, in 1870, he claimed to be ‘Captain Scott’ and stood accused of obtaining money by false pretences. He seemed to have been able persuade many Sydney business people to cash valueless cheques for him.

The second time it was on charges relating to his theft of gold from the London Chartered Bank in Egerton.

Curators are currently trying to find out more about his time in Sydney. We’ll keep you updated on any discoveries.

 

About the Author

Sydney Living Museums Image
Nerida Campbell
Curator
Justice & Police Museum, Museum of Sydney, Susannah Place Museum
Nerida’s passion for history was influenced by childhood holidays spent at her grandmother’s farm, happily rifling through chests brimming with family photographs, generations of clothing and things she still can’t identify.

Closed until further notice.

 

COVID-19 updateFriday 25 June 2021

In line with decisions made by the NSW Government, Sydney Living Museums will close to the public from Saturday 26 June to Friday 9 July (inclusive) to help protect the health of all visitors and staff and minimise the spread of COVID-19 (coronavirus) in the state.

Exterior of white-painted two storey building with verandahs.

 

Conservation in action: Rum Hospital's verandah and columnsThursday 9 September 2021

Structural repairs and conservation of the timber verandah and columns of the former ‘Rum Hospital’

Iridescent by Gerwyn Davies

Museum of Sydney

The artist behind Australia’s most outlandish selfiesMonday 6 September 2021

Pacifica Frances Burke textile

Collections

Frances Burke TextilesMonday 30 August 2021

A wonderful new book has hit our desk in the last week - Frances Burke: designer of modern textiles. Authors Nanette Carter and Robyn Oswald-Jacobs have produced...