Beulah as native fauna refuge

A male koala has been seen in the bushland at Beulah, our Endangered Houses Fund property south of Campbelltown, this month. 

It is the second recent sighting of a koala on the property, after a female koala with joey in pouch was spotted in May.  

Both animals were untagged, which suggests that they had not been observed and identified in earlier fauna studies. These sightings are exciting news, given that koala numbers overall are in decline. The cause of the reduced numbers of koalas has been linked to habitat loss and land clearing, with the Australian Koala Foundation estimating that 80% of koala habitat has already disappeared.

These koala sightings reinforce the opinion that the large areas of bushland at Beulah provide an important fauna corridor between the Georges River to the east of Appin Road and the Nepean River to the west.

Beulah is a 90 hectare rural property at Gilead, south of Campbelltown.  It features an 1830’s homestead that was once owned by the pioneering Hume family. About 60 hectares is regenerating Cumberland Plain Woodland, an ecologically diverse plant community now only remaining in fragments in western Sydney.  

Since 2011, SLM has managed this bushland as a Biobank because the remnant native bushland is of high conservation value.

The bushland is also a known habitat for the Gang-gang Cockatoo and is likely habitat for a number of threatened bird and bat species, as well as the Cumberland Land Snail.

 

  • Koala sitting in fork of gum tree.
  • Koala with back turned, climbing in tree.
  • Nighttime shot of koala in tree with eyes reflecting camera flare.

Author

Mark Brandon

Heritage Project Manager - Capital Works